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From: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH


Scientists report new details into the link between epilepsy and suicidal behavior, finding suicide attempts--whether a first attempt or a recurrent attempt--are associated with new onset epilepsy in the absence of antiepileptic drug prescriptions and a diagnosis of psychiatric disorder, further strengthening the evidence that there is an underlying commonality. The researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia University Medical Center and are the first to report these associations. Findings are published online in JAMA Psychiatry.

 

The study, led by Dale Hesdorffer, PhD, professor of Epidemiology, compared the risk for a first suicide attempt in 14,059 patients who later developed epilepsy to 56,184 age and gender matched controls. For patients who later had onset of epilepsy there was a 2.4-fold increased risk for a first suicide

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From: American Epilepsy Society

 

PHILADELPHIA, December 7, 2015 - Uncontrolled epilepsy affects more than 1.2 million Americans, often requiring a series of trials and errors to identify effective drug combinations. Continuous, long-term EEG data could streamline this process by revealing the full picture of a patient's seizure activity, but this would require a costly and inconvenient hospital stay.

 

An array of personal monitoring devices - including three to be unveiled at the American Epilepsy Society's (AES) 69th Annual Meeting* - offer biometric recording technology that could allow patients to monitor clinical and subclinical seizure activity in the everyday home environment and get advance warning before a seizure strikes.

 

Researchers from the University of Utah and Epitel Inc., (abstract 2.158) describe an inexpensive, disposable and discreet seizure-monitoring device

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From: American Epilepsy Society

 

PHILADELPHIA, December 7, 2015 - Researchers are only beginning to understand the implications of disrupted sleep in people with epilepsy. Recent findings suggest that seizure-interrupted sleep could impede memory formation, impair cognitive performance and influence a myriad of other aspects of daily life. Four studies presented at the American Epilepsy Society's (AES) 69th Annual Meeting unveil previously unappreciated links between sleep disturbances and seizure control, and help clarify the causes and consequences of these issues in people with epilepsy.

 

In the first study, (abstract 3.019|A.01) researchers at Children's National Medical Center report that disruptions in the body's 24-hour clock, or circadian rhythm, might contribute to certain types of epilepsy.

 

The authors performed a genetic analysis of brain tissue from children who

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From: American Epilepsy Society

 

PHILADELPHIA, December 5, 2015 - Three studies to be presented at the American Epilepsy Society's (AES) 69th Annual Meeting describe novel devices and technologies that could reshape current understanding of the complex mechanisms underpinning seizure development in the brain.

 

Two of the three studies unveil information about the neural networks that produce and propagate seizure activity, providing information that could help refine and target surgical interventions.

 

In the first study, (abstract 2.076|A.05) researchers from the University of Pennsylvania describe an array of transparent electrodes that can capture high-resolution images of neuronal activity in a live animal brain while simultaneously gathering electrophysiological information about neuron function.

 

The team previously demonstrated the technology in a single

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Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report | MMWR |

Seizures in Children and Adolescents Aged 6–17 Years — United States, 2010–2014

 

Seizures affect nearly 1 in 100 children. It is important to educate new parents and school personnel about the risk of seizures and how to recognize them. Parents and schools should connect families of children with seizures to health and social services providers. Data from the 2010-2014 National Health Interview Survey indicate that seizures, a short change in normal brain activity, affect 336,000 or 0.7 percent of US children and adolescents aged 6–17 years. Compared to children and adolescents without seizures, those with seizures were more likely to have co-occurring conditions, live in families at lower income levels, and have unmet social and health care needs. Public health agencies can work with other health and human service agencies to raise awareness about seizures in

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